18 Jan 2014

Health: Google's 'Smart Contact Lens' for Diabetes Patients

This handout photo obtained January 17, 2014, courtesy of Google shows a smart contact lens. The Google lab known for working on unusual projects like self-driving cars is crafting a contact lens that could help diabetics manage blood sugar levels."We're now testing a smart contact lens that's built to measure glucose levels in tears," project co-founders Brian Otis and Babak Parviz said January 16, 2014 in a blog post.The lens works "using a tiny wireless chip and miniaturized glucose sensor that are embedded between two layers of soft contact lens material," Otis and Parviz said.
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Google has launched a sample for a smart contact lens intended to help diabetics by nursing glucose levels in the wearer’s tears.
Google says that the sensors, which are used in lenses, are so small that they “look like bits of glitter”. The technology is being urbanized by the search giant’s ‘X’ lab who have developed special miniaturized electronics necessary to take the readings.
Google report in a blog post declaring the new technology, “Abundant of blood sugar create complexity, some short term and some long term, including damage to the eyes, kidneys and heart.”
The current generation of the technology is accomplished of pleasing a reading once per second using sensors inserted between two layers of a soft contact lens.
The second generation of lens could integrate LED lights into the design, illuminating up in the corner of the wearers vision to facilitate warning that glucose levels have crossed above or below give threshold, according to Google.
“We are presently holding conference with FDA (the US agency responsible for Public Health Regulations) and they are anticipating for coordinators to help convey the product to market,” said Brian Otis and Babak Parviz, project co-founders.
They expect that it will take at least five years for the product to reach consumers.
Company said that it is primary days for technology, but we have finished several surgical researches which are helping to improve our prototype.
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